Bonsai Display

Just wanted to show off a few of the trees we had on display during our Spring Festival. We had a lot of fun during this event and can’t wait to start planning the next one!

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Spring Festival Spotlight

Today we are doing another spotlight on one of the classes that will be offered during our annual Spring Festival here at Schley’s Bonsai and Supplies. Another one taught by our special Guest Artist Sean Smith, and this time you’ll get the chance to build your own bonsai display table. Sean has an extensive background in both carpentry and bonsai so this should be an excellent time for all!

Not only do you get to craft your own table, but Sean will also give a history on how display tables got their start in the realm of bonsai and explain how best to use them. Tips on choosing the right set up, including accent pieces will also be discussed. This is a new class for us here, unlike the root stand carving class which was also featured at our January event (you can sign up for a root stand class during the event by clicking this link).

As with our other classes and workshops, lunch is included in the price. By the end of the day, you will be taking home a fully assembled and stained black walnut bonsai stand at less than the cost it would be to purchase the stand outright!

Getting to hold these kinds of events and share knowledge about the different aspects in the bonsai world is one of my favorite parts about being in this business. I hope we get to see all of you here in April. Click Here to save your spot before they are all sold out!

When: Saturday, April 6, 2019 at 3:00 PM

Where: 2745 Audubon Ave, DeLand, FL 32720

Don’t forget to RSVP!

Spring Festival Spotlight

Spring Fesival

As always, we will have free beer available during our Spring Festival. On site we will also have a menu of fresh, hot food available for purchase (or free when you participate in one of our classes or workshops).

received_533246773818067On Sunday morning (April 7th), Sean Smith will be teaching another session of his tall root stand carving class. No experience in woodworking is necessary to participate in this class where you get to take home a work of excellent art at the end of the day. At less than $100, this class is a steal!

You’ll want to stick around for the rest of the day Sunday after this class to catch a free demonstration as well. And, following the final two classes of the event, the three bonsai demonstration trees from the weekend will be raffled off!

To sign up for this class (or one of the many others) visit our website or Click Here. Admission is free and open to all who want to make the trip out here in DeLand to learn more about an ancient art.

We are getting close and are excited to share this wonderful time with all of you!

When: Friday, Saturday, and Sunday (April 5th, 6th, and 7th)
Where: 2745 Audubon Ave, DeLand, FL 32720
What: Schley’s Bonsai 2019 Spring Festival

RSVP Now

Annual Spring Festival Details

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Hey everybody, our January event was super fun but now we are gearing up again for something even better! Like with the winter event, everything at the shop will be 20% off during the festival. And beyond that, we have a weekend jam-packed with things to do!

This year it takes place Friday through Sunday, April 5th, 6th, and 7th.

Our Guest Artist, Sean Smith, is returning this April and will be taking the lead in several classes, workshops, and demos. As usual this event will have FREE BEER as well as lunch available on site (included in the cost of the classes and workshops).

New this year is our bonsai display area, if you are interested in having your bonsai on display during the event, contact Jason at schleybonsai@aol.com or call (386) 675-3118 for more information.

During this event there will be free demonstrations each day. For more information about the individual classes and workshops, CLICK HERE.

RSVP TO THE EVENT ON FACEBOOK

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This Weekend is our Winter Event

We still have a few spots left for classes during this event, but with the weekend fast approaching I wanted to take the time to show off some of the trees our students will be able to choose from. I also wanted to gush a bit more about this years Guest Artist. So, onward…

We have two instances of Sean Smith’s wood carving class, both with a shorter block and a taller (both pictured above). No woodworking experience is required in order to participate in this class, though students will need to come prepared with their own electric dremel. This class is good for those who are new to bonsai, as you can still create a work of art without the fear and responsibility of long-term care of a plant. It’s a pretty neat and artistic way to get your bonsai feet wet. Equally rewarding for those experienced in bonsai and looking to enhance their skill set by creating a beautiful stand to use when showing off their trees. Click Here to learn more and to save your spot before they are all gone!

When: (Shorter stand) Friday, January 25th at 1:30PM and (Taller stand) Saturday, January 26th at 9:00AM

Where: 2745 Audubon Ave, DeLand FL, 32720

Interested in learning the basics of bonsai from one of the best artists in Florida?

On Sunday, January 27th we will be having an all day beginner class taught by Mike Rogers. You’ll get your very own tree along with the tools needed to start styling your new work of art. You’ll have the chance to choose your own Juniper from our selection, the images above are just a few examples we have out on the tables. Click Here for more information on the class and to claim your spot.

While we have Sean Smith with us, he will be teaching several other classes. One of them will be a class on Bald Cypresses, where you will get your very own tree to begin styling. This class is also on Sunday, at 9:00 AM. These are pretty massive and more than ready to begin their life in bonsai. Click Here for more information and to claim your spot.

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Sean Smith will also being leading a Bring Your Own Tree Workshop on Friday morning. He will give you a plan of attack to design your tree, with direction on styling and wiring. Click Here to learn more.

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New Inventory for the New Year

We have been working hard to bring in new inventory as we prepare for our upcoming event. We want to have lots of stock and finished trees on offer to make the drive out here worth it for all of you. More than just having our guest artists at the shop to expand your knowledge, we want to have a selection of trees that speak to each and every one of you.

After spending the weekend picking up several truck loads of new stock, I’d be lying if I said my back didn’t ache. Who knew this getting older thing would stick?

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Fortunately for me, one of my Christmas presents this year was a back massager. I’ve needed it more than once after picking up and transporting hundreds of trees. So. Much. Lifting.

Now all we have to do is weed them. And organize. And trim. And…okay, so, work isn’t done yet but I’m excited to get to it and to experience our Winter Event with all of you. One of my favorite parts of this job is leading other people into this hobby, watching them learn and grow as the years go along. It’s always so rewarding when someone comes to bonsai with fresh eyes and excitement. I’ve been doing this for over twenty years and there is still little I enjoy more than watching someone fall in love with bonsai for the first time.

Obviously bonsai is no longer just a hobby for me, I chose to focus on it and to make it an every day, pivotal part of my life and I wouldn’t change that for anything. But even without starting a nursery yourself, you can incorporate some of the skills, teachings, and general atmosphere surrounding this hobby into your every day life.

Bonsai teaches us patience, gentleness, and  thoughtfulness. These things can be hard to find in this day and age. But with this art form, we can take a page from a way of life that at times feels unreachable with the constant rush of modern life. In the simple moments you take every week to care for your own bonsai, you gain a snippet of quiet contemplation and a connection with nature.

Happy New Year, everyone. May 2019 bring you peace and prosperity. I look forward to keeping up with this blog again and getting to share a slice of life with all of you. Thank you for being part of this journey!

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Coming to our event? Let us know! You can RSVP on our Event Page on Facebook HERE.

What marketing plans to make the art of bonsai mainstream

Ok, so I’m gearing up for another very busy spring. We have been repotting and wiring and planting trees nonstop this Jan,   feb, and March in anticipation of busy season in April and to get ready for our April spring festival.  ( april 15th, 16th, and 17th), just sitting down waiting for tea bags to do their work to the hot water,  when I noticed yet another article on the withering of the art of bonsai in Scotland.
    I had just read a similar article on the withering of the art of bonsai in America last week.  Considering this is my full time job,  and now the full time job of David,  my son Avery,  myself,  and a yet to be determined future online manager, this was disconcerting to say the least.  I actually disagree with that statement, at least in the US.  In the 25 years I’ve been doing bonsai,  and in the 13 years schley’s bonsai was been in business,  I’ve never seen more people in the 1 to 5 year active range.  Sure,  when I started there were more people,  but they were the previous generation,  that got excited by the wave of enthusiasm in the 70s, or were swept up in their excitement in the 80s with karate kid franchise.  Most of those people unfortunately moved,  or moved on from this earth,  the central florida hobby suffering with each loss .
  I was the youngest in the club back then,   at least who stayed long term,  for years. The next youngest members beating me by at least 12 years.  That slowly changed,  which was wonderful, since I’m no spring chicken these days,  but it was still just a trickle of new members. Not a flood like most of us bonsai hobbyists expect when we get into this hobby and can’t imagine anyone in their right mind not doing this.  There wasn’t even enough new members to replace the old,  or in some cases just enough.
  Now we have the Internet.  That alone has simultaneously made this hobby emense, but even smaller all at the same time.  I see people and talk to them in Texas, Michigan,  Ohio,  Utah,   California,  Louisiana and Oregon on literally a weekly basis.  That is amazing.
  I have been doing classes for beginners since 2004 on a once a month basis.  I would expect some would bow out of hobby due to other interests, but some will surprise me a couple years later seeing them still interested and still with the same living trees. They will come in and require help or supplies.  And this is once again encouraging. 
However,  I still think we are too nitchy.
The people in bonsai come from all walks of life,  which is fantastic,  but also may be why we are still so tiny in comparison with other hobbies. Golf,  for instance.  Surfing,  biking,  even orchids if we are going to stay in the plant genres.
So I propose that we start to focus on certain groups,  and try to make bonsai a part of said group.  Here are some examples.

Retirees?
Sure.  A bonsai in each hand.  A requirement for mature enlightenment. This has always been one of our strong factions .  At a certain age,  backs and knees don’t work like they used to,  and bonsai is a great way to enjoy nature without getting on your knees to plant and pull weeds and trees.  It makes perfect sense.

Chess players?
  Why not.  In bonsai,  you need to think 5 moves ahead.  And it takes years,  even decades to master.  And you only get better when you go against better competition. Not a hobby anyone will get board with because they have mastered it.  Not going to happen.

Truck drivers?
Hear me out on this one.
Driving on the road can be extremely stressful and extremely long and boring all during the same day. Cars may dart out in front or a bridge may be precariously low.  Sure, after work it’s good to unwind with a beer and burger, or possibly self destructive habits to relax,  but as bonsai growers can attest to,  bonsai is a great form of meditation to relax and wind down for the day,  or even gear up for the morning to bring your mind in focus, before you are dodging that tiny car that had no idea you almost squashed them like a bug.   It’s really a great transitional event either way.

Yoga practitioners?
You betcha. Meditation.  It fits like peas and carrots. In fact,  every yoga student should have at least 3, so they can always have one in their meditation/yoga studio,  and 2 outside in the sun to stay healthy,  and cycle them out.  They really need more,  but the start is 3. If every yoga student got into the art in the US,  we would become the biggest bonsai consumer in the world. 
In fact,  there is maybe another group of people I think could transport bonsai from a niche hobby to a mainstream phenomenon. Case in point.

Hipsters?
If we could get the hipsters excited about it in the states, like truely interested to almost “I need to improve my tree, this is more than a passing fad, but a lifestyle and I need to show how ironic I am” level,  it could kill two birds with one stone. One: is youth as hipsters tend to be under 40. In fact under 30 their ranks swell to pseudo main stream,  and because of that,  Two:  get the hobby more into main stream.
   So that’s my calling. Make the hobby 1# with the ironic artsy crowd.  It also may take the hobby in a few different directions many never thought of,  which is fine as well for the sake of art.  America has a large influx very quality,  youthful talent right now,  but it still seems to wax and wane. Let’s make it so large and such a part of everyday lifestyles that it no longer wanes to any noticeable level. 
The yoga crowd, the truck drivers,  the retirees, the chess players,  in fact,  every man woman and child should get in this hobby.  It will elevate and appreciate all aspects of bonsai. 
Ok my morning thoughts.  A little tongue in cheek.  But not.
Come to our event.  Bring a hipster.  Or a truck driver.

Live oak (Quercus virginiana) gets its first styling

Today’s project.

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This is one of 15 southern live oaks I have left of the origonal 50 cut back and container grown from seed for the last 13 years as of this summer. It was left in a pot for a few reasons.  One,  to sell. It’s difficult to sell a tree in the ground,  expecially out of season when you can’t safely dig it up.  Also,  ease of maintenance.  It’s a lot easier to keep trimmed and clean in a 12″ bulb pan.  This was cut to a line and placed on a finished container a year ago. The roots were close and it tolerated an aggressive root trimming, just like all the others. Plus,  tons of activity in the soil.  It’s amazing how much healthier they are with good drainage and correct fertilizing.

If it was grown in the ground,  or even in a larger container for a few years,  it would be triple this sized.  In fact,  30 more of the original batch of oaks in 2003 were left to grow into A1 landscaping and the last 7 I have left are all over 4″ inch trunks and 10′ tall now. Just goes to show you what limiting roots in bulb pans or bonsai pots can do to tree stunting.  I  agree that growing on the ground is the best way to thicken trunks long term. However,  it is at the expense of any branch refinement. You grow those later,  in stages.  The ground is not for refinement,  it’s for trunk development.  On a side note, root maker pots seem to be a good tradeoff on trunk development,  plus being able to do some initial styling work.     One thing I did notice,  is oaks have beneficial microbes in the soil.  More than any other tree I work with other than pines.  And health is indicative by amount of living organisms in mix and just general toughness.   Oaks are hungry, but really thrive with organic fertilizer, which makes perfect sense if the microbes in the soil do in fact help uptake nutrients like other trees displaying similar traits.
Neat stuff.
So,  I did the initial wiring. Instead of curing back hard,  I wanted to try to replicate some of the trees on the property.  How some of the branches are very long,  And actually touch the ground,  reroot, and come back up again.  This isn’t there yet, but I’m trying to give you an idea.  Also,  top straight section on upper trunk has to back bud, and be replaced in the future to create more believable taper and a better transition. I didn’t cut it back hard because we are in fall here. Leaving extra foliage up top will keep it viable and vigorous. Heavy cuts are for spring.  The last burst of growth will be nice,  And set it up next year’s chop and rewire. I’ll also do some carving on hollow in front.  Enjoy

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Nashia Inaguensis: the Hidden Awesome-ness

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Hey everybody, I figured I’d get out a blog post because I finally finished this tree and am working on a few more from the same batch. This type is Bahama berry (Nashia inaguensis), which aren’t really trees per se. I thought it turned out pretty well.

Bahama berry is native to Aruba but a few of the nurseries down in South Florida carry them. I first heard of this type from a sweet couple who used to grow them from cuttings. Incidentally, they are the ones who started me on the path to retailing bonsai back in 1997 when I bought their collection. In that collection were about ten of this type of plant, this is one of four that I still have from that original batch. In the last 17 or so years I’ve made at least a thousand cuttings from those original ten.

It is definitely a tropical, for about five years I had them in the ground and every time it got below 40, even with a frost blanket, they would lose most leaves, stop growing, and pout. Their biggest problem is that they don’t like to dry out ever. As Mary Miller stated years ago, another name for them is “I Dry, I Die”.

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Busy at the farm with Jades and finishing up repotting for season

Hey everybody. It’s officially the hottest part of the summer here in Florida, but the silver lining is now it’s going to start to get cooler and cooler as we head off to Fall. Plus, the daily rains we’ve had for the last few months is also a reprieve from the heat. Not so much for the humidity. 90% nonstop humidity isn’t for everyone. Sweating standing still is an acquired taste. However, we don’t really have a winter here, which is the reason I live here in the south.  Six months of perfect weather, Can’t wait.

That said, this is the time to do all the tropical tree work, and we are in full swing. I started repotting once the nights were above 55 so the roots would recover.  That’s usually around April 1st here in central Florida, and I continue to repot and frankly beat up my tropicals till around Sept 15th.  The reason why we stop when it’s pretty hot is because the roots typically need 6 weeks of active growth to recover, and November 1st is the beginning of when we sometimes see nights below 55F.

Till then, it’s “beat the band” till we get it done. And this year we got it done. 500 new trees in containers. With another 100 to finish up the season.

Also, I have been finally styling up some trees again.  I got so hung up on the repotting, that I had missed out on the styling . I always forget how much I love this job, Until I get wire on some trees.

This time, I decided to get a hold of some old jades. These are sweet old trees. One was from a tree I had sold as a “mature” bonsai ten years ago, one was from a collection that the original owner got from Jim Smith, and one was from Jim Moody’s nursery that his grandson now maintains and improves.

Here are some of the before pictures.

I repotted this in May, with the intention of wiring it once it was established.  It is now pretty established, with new growth everywhere and roots coming out the bottom.

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And here is what it looked like after a couple hours of trimming and wiring.

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And this guy. This is the tree I sold ten years ago. The previous owner has very good at keeping trees healthy, but only used shears to keep growth in check. Time for some work.

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And here it is after I cut the straight sections out, the no taper areas, and the general flaws

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Still too many branches.  Ahh. Better.  Now the wiring begins.

20150813_161249  Final Product.   I like the pot, but I’m going to change it up a bit.  Here it is wired up.

20150813_180720  I like it .  I’ll tell you, for years I have heard that most people

1)”don’t see jades as bonsai”.  Why?  Succulent growth for one.  I don’t think that carries weight. For one,  some Ficus are darn near close to succulents, and we use them in the world in many if not all tropical areas because they grow there and are just plain tough to kill. Boababs, though rare, also make amazing bonsai. And are VERY succulent trees. Among many others, too many to list, quite frankly.

2) “you can’t wire a jade’.  For those folks I say, see above.  The other beautiful thing is, if it starts to dig in, take the wire off, the branch sets, and the wire marks pump up like a water balloon.

3)”It doesn’t have a woody trunk” Well, that is very true. It is a succulent trunk. However, it does get a rough bark that gets rougher with age. And some varieties have a very rough, corky bark. The issue with jades in general is, if its kept too wet, too cold, or too shady. Or any combination of the three, you can get rot.  Rot is the bane of any succulent. Especially if the trunk is the main focus. Having an entire trunk collapse due to a four day rain has crushed a few folk. To really put a damper on your day is for that to happen after ten years of work.

The trick is,

1)Don’t water after a re-pot till you see new growth.

2)Don’t work roots unless its hot.

3)Don’t put it in the shade. The growth will be long and lanky, and it’ll stay wetter longer. Not good for a succulent.

4)Don’t cut all the leaves off a branch. it might not back bud. I know many people will disagree and show the jades busting out all over after a defoliation from shears ,  or an elephant. Yes, the elephants do love them, and eat them to the stems. However, in a bonsai pot, it may abort bare branches to focus on new branches close to main trunk.  That may set you back a season.  Leaving one set of leaves per sub-branch will eliminate the problem.

5) Don’t  water once the temp gets below 60 F, unless the leaves start to wilt, and that may take weeks.  Root rot is the bane of jades, and water and stressed wet roots on a tropical succulent is a recipe for a seemingly healthy tree. Trust me, it happens. and if the tree is staying wet between watering,  slow down your schedule. It’ll root twice as fast.

Root the cuttings. If you are so inclined. Nothing says house warming like a sweet little house plant I.E. future bonsai to your friends and family. they root fine in just about anything.

These are just guidelines. not rules listed in stone. Jades is a tough plant and tolerates tons of abuse. If you have any other advise, shoot a message in the response section, We may post it for you if its a good one.

After I saw Jim Smiths Jades at his nursery, back in 98, then later that day at his home, I knew these types of trees could end up being something amazing in the bonsai community, since Jim had obviously already shown everyone the possibilities.  I didn’t post a picture out of respect for him,  but you can google it and see some of the most amazing HUGE Jades in the US, maybe the world. He has two at Heathcote gardens in Florida if you ever get a chance to visit. I strongly suggest you do.

I’m going to start blogging about various types of trees we have at the nursery, to coincide with new inventory we are working and shaping.  If you have a type you’d like info on that I have been growing ,   please put it in the comments section, or send me an Email through our “contact us” section on our website. I am also going to be offering these trees shown on this blog shortly, once wires have set some and they are back-budding profusely.

Thank you for your support,

Jason

http://www.schleysbonsai.com